Book Review: Hear the Beat, Feel the Music

As anyone who has spent any time reading my blog or interacting with my website should know by now, I’m very passionate about music, dance and the relationship between the two.  I’m also very analytical about those subjects.  And, yes, I believe passion and analysis can co-exist, don’t you?

The fatal flaw with my perspective for people who are learning to dance but don’t have a musical background is that I came at music first and dance much later.  So as much as I try, the way I think about the relationship between dance and music comes from a music first perspective. 

That’s why I was thrilled to happen upon the book Hear the Music, Feel the Beat by James Joseph.  This book is a well crafted dance first perspective to understanding how dance and music relates.  He does a terrific job of walking through the basics of music theory with pretty close to the minimum amount of information that a dancer needs to get by.  And he is very careful to call out the places where he goes deeper than absolutely necessary so those that aren’t interested in those details can skim past.

On the subject of going deeper, one thing that I took away from this book that I hadn’t heard before was the term mini-phrase.  This is a nice term for what I think of (and Mr. Joseph also refers to) as an eight count (or six count in Waltz).  For many dances this is the basic unit and I’ve heard dancers refer to this unit simply as a phrase, but that causes substantial cognitive dissonance with my musicians brain which insists on thinking of a phrase as the substantially longer chunk of generally 48 to 64 beats (although that varies depending type of music or even the particular song).  So mini-phrase fits perfectly, and that even lets me use the term “phrase” out loud with dancers while tagging on the “mini” part in my head.

This mini-phrase is also something that I would like to incorporate in my tempo counter tool.  When I wrote this years ago I set things up to consider tempo in beats and in measures (of different meters).  But I’m in the middle of a rewrite, so I think having a 8 count and 6 count mini-phrases would be a valuable addition.

Overall this is a great read.  And the bonus videos with practical exercises will be an immense help to anyone learning to dance that is struggling with “musicality.”

As always, I welcome feedback both on this post and the site in general.  I’d like to thank everyone who has contributed to the site in any of the many possible ways.  And if you enjoy the site please consider contributing in any way that makes sense to you.


Note: If you found this book through this blog, please be kind and click on the link above to purchase it. This helps support the blog. If you’re feeling especially generous (or just like the blog a lot) clicking on the Amazon links in the blog or on the music4dance site and then doing your regular, unrelated shopping which also help support the site as a very small fraction of those proceeds will be directed to musci4dance.

One thought on “Book Review: Hear the Beat, Feel the Music”

  1. music4dance, thanks for the nice review of my book, “Hear the Beat, Feel the Music: Count, Clap and Tap Your Way to Remarkable Rhythm.” Glad to see you like the term “mini-phrase.” I agree, it’s frustrating when you talk to musicians because they liberally use the word “phrase.” In my experience, when I ask them how many beats are in a phrase, they’ll say something like, “4 or 8 or 16 or 32 or 64, it just depends.”

    I think a related term worth mentioning to your readers is “major phrase.” A major phrase is a group of mini-phrases that come together to create a complete musical thought. Metaphorically, mini-phrases are like sentences and the major phrase is like a paragraph. The most common major phrase in dance music is the 32-beat phrase, which is four 8-counts (ie, four mini-phrases), although major phrases vary in length. If you were choreographing an amalgamation of moves in dance, you’ll probably do it to the major phrase.

    Let me know if I can be of any further help. For your readers who don’t want to buy my book, here’s the video playlist for the book, which is more than 20 short, free, instructional youtube videos: HearTheBeatFeelTheMusic.com

    Like

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